Kent L. Norman received his doctorate from the University of Iowa in Experimental Psychology. He is an Associate Professor at the University of Maryland where he is the director of the Laboratory for Automation Psychology and Decision Processes (LAPDP, http://www.lap.umd.edu) and is a founding member of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory (HCIL, http://www.cs.umd.edu/hcil) since 1984. His research is on human/computer interaction, cognitive issues in interface design, usability research, and the design of electronic educational environments. He is the developer of HyperCourseware™, a prototype for blended classroom and Web-based learning and the co-developer of the QUIS™, the Questionnaire for Interaction Satisfaction. His most recent book is Cyberpsychology: An introduction the human-computer interaction, (2008). His most recent research is on the psychology of digital games and entertainment. He retired January 2018 after 42 years at the University  of Maryland.

Doctoral Programs

  • Cognitive and Neural Systems (CNS)
  • Social, Decision, and Organizational Sciences (SDOS)

Degrees

  • PhD
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa

Humans are human and machines are machines. An interface exists between humans and machines. The human/computer interface is one sided in the sense that the human side has all the brains and the machine side has all bits and bytes. Empirical research and guiding theory are required to direct the design of the interface rather than reliance on millions of years of evolution. In the design of the interface, human needs and desires take precedence over machine requirements and limitations. While some humans are smarter than other humans, and some machines are faster than other machines, no machine acting independently of humans is smarter than a human acting independently of a machine. Machines were created by humans to serve humans. Although some humans hold that humans were created by God to serve the Creator, no machines hold that machines were created by humans to serve humans or vice versa. Therefore, we should investigate the nature of the human mind and its use of machines to solve problems, make decisions, and accomplish goals, investigate design features of the interface that facilitate the cognitive processing of the human mind in the pursuit of its goals, expose design flaws, biases, prejudices, and the ideologies of designers embedded in the interface that have a negative impact on users. encourage students to publish papers and attend conferences with a sense of purpose and excitement.

Former Students

  • Student Name
    Susan Campbell
    Current Position
    Center for the Advanced Study of Language (CASL), College Park, Maryland
  • Student Name
    Diane Lindwarm Alonso
    Current Position
    Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore Campus
  • Student Name
    Scott A. Butler
    Current Position
    Principal at Ovo Studios LLC, http://www.ovostudios.com/
  • Student Name
    Virginia Diehl
    Current Position
    Western Illinois University Psychology Department, Macomb, IL
  • Student Name
    John Chin
    Current Position
    Marketing Manager at Verizon Wireless
  • Student Name
    Gerry Gingrich
    Current Position
    IRM College National Defense University Fort McNair Washington, DC
  • Student Name
    Michael J. Singer
    Current Position
    U.S. Army Research Institute Simulator Systems Research Unit TAPC-ARI-IF, Orlando, FL
  • Student Name
    Walky (Rivadeneira) Goode
    Current Position
    Associate Director, Website and Digital Management at American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
  • Student Name
    Robert Vernon Phillips
    Current Position
    Principal at Rovephi Washington D.C.
  • Student Name
    Daniel Wallace
    Current Position
    Human Factors Engineer at NAVSEA Washington D.C
  • Student Name
    Leslie E. Carter
    Current Position
    Sr. User Experience & Human Factors Engineer Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina
 Kent Norman
Email
klnorman [at] umd.edu